Designing Library Spaces – From Dreams to Reality

We are fortunate here in Brisbane Catholic Education in that almost every school has a library. This space, whether it is a state of the art, architect designed, contemporary I-Centre or a converted classroom made warm and welcoming with paint, cushions and a few comfy chairs provides not just an area to house books and resources, but a space where just about anything is possible!

“But libraries are about freedom.

Image in the Public Domain. Click to read the entire speech by Neil Gaiman.

 

Although the traditional role of the library as the source of information has changed in the age of Google, every school still needs one (preferably well staffed with qualified, passionate teacher librarians and library technicians!). Libraries are the hub of a school – a third space, away from the pressures students can feel in the classroom and on the sports fields, where they can choose to work or play, where they can investigate or read for leisure, where they can meet friends or just be alone – it is a place of choice, as well as a space which provides not only access to books and physical resources, but increasingly to other collections such as realia, maker tools, new technologies and expert advice on how to navigate increasingly complex online worlds. While students (and teachers) may have a world of information via the smartphone in their pocket, the library is the place where they can go to find out just how to make the best of this trove, and to get tips and tricks to access databases, online journals and a range of other ‘deep web’ resources.

Recently, I was fortunate to be taken on a tour of the beautiful new Beanland Memorial Library at Brisbane Girls Grammar by the Director of Information Services Mrs Kristine Cooke, as she shared her wisdom about the development of the building and the value of the library within the school.

This video charts the progress of this amazing space:

The library is merely months old, and many of the ‘ways of working’ have yet to be finalised. However as Kris shared, its many small spaces are already being embraced by the girls of the school, who keenly await her arrival at 7am to open the doors of the library, and who must be ‘pushed out the doors’ when it closes at 5pm. Why, when the information they seek could easily be accessed from elsewhere, is this space so popular?

BBG LibraryIs it because of the multitude of seating types available for different working styles? The inspiring artworks that decorate the space? The gorgeous curving stairwells that led the girls to nickname the library ‘Hogwarts’? Well yes, all of these elements appeal – but they are not the whole story. It is also because the atmosphere of this library is welcoming and safe. The inner city location and high academic expectations of the school definitely play a part, however walking into the space, it is also clear that thought has been given to the ‘feel’ of the library. Kris and her library staff obviously have a passion for providing a haven for students that goes beyond providing a space strictly for  learning, and that passion provides a space for comfort and leisure as well as hard work; an environment that makes you want to broaden your horizons, just as the large glass windows broaden the view into the beautiful fig tree outside.

The Brisbane Girls Grammar Library has a budget larger than most; but a similar atmosphere can be achieved with far less investment.

This slideshare has a wide range of simple ideas to rethink and redesign your space.

For more inspiration, check out this fantastic Pinterest Board compiled by Associate Professor Hilary Hughes, who leads the Designing Spaces for Learning subject as part of the QUT Master of Education course.

Image sourced from the Public Domain.

Image sourced from the Public Domain.

Libraries are far more than a home for dusty shelves of books; share your actual or dream library ideas in the comments.

 

Chibitronics – Mashing Craft and Electronics in an exciting Maker Opportunity

Girl in chibi styleFor those who are fans of Manga or Anime, the term Chibi will be familiar as one used to describe super cute figures, usually with tiny bodies and huge heads. Chibi also is a Japanese slang term for tiny. Whether it is their tiny size or the super cute things you can create,the name ‘Chibitronics’ was a great choice of inventor, Jie Qi,. Chibitronics combine tiny sensors and electronic circuits with stickers, making it possible for anyone with imagination and some time to create interactive designs.

Chibitronics are an exciting addition to a Makerspace. They consist of tiny circuits on stickers, which can be combined with copper tape or conductive paint to make almost anything interactive. (click on the images below for a larger picture of these tiny stickers).

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Although the kits come with extra sticky backing so they can be re-used, the nature of chibitronics is that they are essentially consumable. This means that for those planning their inclusion in a makerspace, they are more effective as a special project material.

The starter kit is a great introduction, and provides everything you need to get started, as well as a comprehensive ‘sketchbook’ that gives examples of different ways of using the components and materials, including creating a simple circuit, parallel circuits, diy switches, blinking slide switches and DIY pressure sensors. Copper tape is supplied, and this or conductive paint can be used to create the circuits. The option to follow the instructions and create interactive examples within the pages of the sketchbook is there, or the simple projects can be reproduced using just paper or card.

Click on the image to go to this tutorial on the Chibitronics site.

Click on the image to go to this tutorial on the Chibitronics site.

The combination of circuitry and creativity that Chibitronics enables leads to a huge number of STEAM opportunities, where artistic creations can be made truly interactive. I created a simple interactive Library poster, where lights indicate different sections of the library when one presses the stickers next to the floorplan legend:
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On the back of the colour overlay, are copper tape ‘switches’ that close the circuit to light the appropriate area when the gold sticker is pressed. You can see how it works in the video below:

Online, there is a Chibitronics forum community where ideas can be shared, and lots of wonderful creations to spark the imagination available on the Projects page

For those who want to extend themselves, Chibtronics also has advanced stickers, that enable you to use sound to activate the lights (watch the lights twinkle in the video below when the sound sensor picks up the breath:

or even connect a microcontroller for added flexibility.

ResourceLink has a kit which includes samples of all of these stickers, as well as the sketchbook and a hyperlink to this post. For schools within Brisbane Catholic Education, you can borrow this kit to see what Chibitronics look like in real life (although you can’t actually use the stickers), and to explore whether or not you would like to invest in a set for a special project with your mini makers (students!).

This is the sample kit you can borrow from ResourceLink. It has examples of all types of Chibitronics for you to look at.

This is the sample kit you can borrow from ResourceLink. It has examples of all types of Chibitronics for you to look at, as well as the interactive library poster example, the Sketchbook and also a photocopiable booklet of the Chibitronic templates and tutorials.

Share your project ideas in the comments; Chibitronics are another fantastic and exciting new way that students can be empowered to apply their scientific knowledge in real and engaging ways to create and invent. Check them out!

 

#Edutechau – Report from the 2015 Edutech Conference

This is why we must have events like Edutech.

The Edutech Conference is the largest of its kind in Australia. Over 1000 delegates, participating in streams reaching broadly across the educational landscape; K-12 Leadership, Teacher Librarianship, IT Directors, Higher Ed, Vocational Education and Training, Tertiary Education, Business Managers – basically if you are in education, there is a stream for you.

The world is undeniably changing, and we must prepare students for a future which will be significantly different to our own experiences. Many speakers, including David Price, author of Open, How We’ll Work, Live and Learn in the Future, pointed out that the rate of technology development is rapidly shaping the skills and capacities required by today’s learners. While the entire 15 minutes of the following video is fascinating viewing, here’s just the final summary, which paints a challenge for everyone in education and indeed in government today:

It wasn’t all doom and gloom though. George Couros asked us to remember that sometimes, it can be easy to be drawn into the myths of technology, and be swayed by the negative hyperbole of the media. His stirring keynote reminded us that there is a lot to be gained from the connections social media enables us to create; both from a learning and a personal point of view. He presented strong challenges to the myths of technology; that it automatically ensures engagement and that connecting with strangers online is inherently dangerous He also argued against the common beliefs that technology will make us narcissistic, replace face to face interaction and dehumanise us, while also making us dumb! You can read more about each of these on George’s blog, where he addresses each of these myths.

One of the highlights of the 3 days was the effervescent Super Awesome Sylvia, who’s have a go attitude and maker videos have brought her world wide attention at age 13. Her short keynote was a great example of ‘feel the fear, and do it anyway’ – she was clearly nervous (as any normal person speaking in front of such a huge crowd would be), but she spoke with passion and simplicity, encouraging everyone to take on a maker mindset, see failure as part of learning and learn through play.

2015-06-09_0933Personally, I had great fun presenting to a group on the value of developing your Personal/Professional/Passionate Learning Network, using Social Media, and also was honoured to be a part of a panel which included Joyce Valenza, Jane Viner and led by Debbie Hunter, where we discussed the value and importance of curation for the Australian Curriculum.

 

Reporting on such a massive conference is challenging, as it is physically impossible to participate in the workshops run simultaneously by world class speakers, and even a keen eye on the mind-boggling tweet stream could only give a glimpse at the amount of information being trafficked. My summary below is just a tiny snapshot. I have included also as many links as I could to the speakers’ handouts, websites or resources, as well as the links to my Storify Summaries, which are on the final page of the presentation below, which was created in my latest tool ‘discovery’, E-Maze.

The video below tries to capture some of the emerging themes of the conference. You can view it at a more leisurely pace, viewing the videos and accessing the hyperlinks (the little orange ‘play’ symbol indicates if a word or phrase is a hyperlink, and every web address should also link directly out) viewing it online here.

If you would like to read more deeply into some of the wisdom shared via twitter by accessing the three Storify summaries I have created – one for each day.

2015-06-09_08282015-06-09_0828_0012015-06-09_0828_002 This was my first experience of Edutech. It was a great confirmation of the work we are doing at schools in Brisbane Catholic Education, and an opportunity to meet with likeminded educators who all share the belief that being an educator is an ongoing learning experience. Share your Edutech experience in the comments below!

 

 

Your Professional/Personal/Passionate Learning Network – Your PLN!

Struggling to stay afloat in a sea of information?

flickr photo shared by kleuske under a Creative Commons ( BY-SA ) license

If there is one thing that is true of education today, it is that change is the only constant. Staying abreast of educational change can seem like a full time job in itself, and sometimes it seems fair enough to think that it is just not possible to stay afloat amid the overwhelming amount of information that is presented to us every day.

You are not alone! We are living in an age of information abundance, and it is no longer reasonable to expect that any one person can hold the entirety of knowledge on any particular topic within their brain, nor keep up with the rate of change in knowledge and information. In fact, people like David Weinberger, author of books such as (the extremely long titled) Too Big to Know: Rethinking Knowledge Now That the Facts are not the Facts, Experts are Everywhere, and the Smartest Person in the Room is the Room and Everything is Miscellaneous go so far as to say that technology is reshaping the way we understand and experience knowledge, and that we must begin to teach network literacy, as it will be the connections that we have, and the ability to access information when we need it that will be a determinant of success in the future, rather than the ability to store knowledge in our own brains, which has previously been how we have assessed expertise.

As educators, we know more than anyone that in a rapidly changing world, a student who has learned how to learn, who is flexible and is able to transfer skills across contexts, and who knows how, when and of whom to ask the right questions are likely to be the most successful – in life, if not in standardised tests.

flickr photo shared by purplechalk under a Creative Commons ( BY-SA ) license

So in an  environment of infowhelm, who can we turn to to seek support, ask questions, share learnings and sometimes just have a laugh (or cry!)? Teachers have always been able to turn to each other for this support, however in a networked world, we are fortunate in that we can reach beyond the boundaries of our own school, and connect with others all over the country and the world.

These well-known diagrams by Alec Couros sum up the potential of making connections for the 21st century educator:

flickr photo shared by courosa under a Creative Commons ( BY-NC-SA ) license

flickr photo shared by courosa under a Creative Commons ( BY-NC-SA ) license

A networked teacher, connecting to the many sources which Alec Couros has described above, has a very healthy PLN – a Personal, Professional, Passionate Learning Network  – a community of like-minded individuals who might never meet in person, but which challenge, push, share, teach and support each other.


flickr photo shared by mrsdkrebs under a Creative Commons ( BY ) license

All of this talk about having a support network sounds nice…but educators are busy people, and you may feel you need more convincing that connecting and developing a PLN is worth the effort. Don’t just take my word for it! Here are some of the wonderful members of my PLN, sharing why they love having a network of teachers and thought-leaders at their fingertips…

why pln

So if you are convinced…or even if you want to give it a go…there are many tools that you can use.
One of the most popular is Twitter, and I have written before on the value of using this tool as a way of making connections with other educators (just click on the link above or on the image below to read the blog post about how to get connected using Twitter).

flickr photo by Rosaura Ochoa http://flickr.com/photos/rosauraochoa/3419823308 shared under a Creative Commons (BY) license

flickr photo by Rosaura Ochoa http://flickr.com/photos/rosauraochoa/3419823308 shared under a Creative Commons (BY) license

 

Of course, Twitter is just one tool; you can build your PLN using Facebook, through subscribing to blogs, by contributing to communities on Google Plus or Diigo, or by connecting with and following curators on Scoopit, Pinterest or Pearltrees. You can choose one or all – the beautiful thing about PLNs is that they are PERSONAL! No one can tell you how best to grow your connections, or which tools will suit you best! You can spend as little or as much time as you like developing your networks, and the flexibility of online PLNs is that they are always accessible – either during working hours, or after hours, whether you are a night person or a morning person, a visual person or a verbal one – you learn the way that suits you best, where it best suits and when.

Hopefully this post has whetted your appetite for exploring the potential of developing your own PLN.

If so, these resources may get you on your way:

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You can also check out my presentation, which I shared at the Edutech Conference in Brisbane in June 2015, (see below) or become part of my PLN – you can follow me on Twitter as KayC28.

PLN using social media

Augmented Reality in Education – update

About 3 years ago, I wrote two posts describing Augmented Reality and exploring the potential of Augmented Reality in education and the workplace: Augmented Reality – Even Better than the Real Thing? and Bringing Augmented Reality to Life – in the classroom and the workplace.

Take a moment to re-read these posts, or, if time is short, watch this great video  which will quickly bring you up to speed on what Augmented Reality is:

As you can expect, a lot changes in three years – resources such as String, which I explored previously have morphed to embrace new concepts, while tools like Aurasma have continued to develop the quality of their experience, providing more reliability and better results than ever before. What’s more, tools like Google Cardboard are moving beyond augmented reality, and providing a completely virtual reality experience – more on this in a future post!

But back to Augmented Reality (AR) – where technology allows you to create a ‘layer’ of information over a person’s experience of the world. When you think about it, educators are the original ‘augmented reality’, providing an overlay to student’s perspectives!

Tools such as Aurasma  enable learning to be engaging in a completely new way, and this post aims at providing some ideas as to how AR can used by students to raise their expression of learning to a new level.

As I introduced in earlier blog posts, Augmented Reality apps come in two main forms: the first is where a printed trigger image initiates an interaction through the camera of the mobile device, and the second where the app uses the mobile device’s GPS capabilities to ‘layer’ digital data over the location where the user is.

It is the first type where students can really get involved in the creation of AR, as they can either create both the trigger image and the overlay, or just overlay their own creation onto an image (or item, e.g. a book cover), through using an app such as Aurasma. There are a few other apps which allow for this AR creation, one notable one being DAQRI (you can see its potential here).  However, Aurasma appears to be the most stable and currently the best on the market. Access to the Educator’s 4D DAQRI Studio appears to be currently unavailable.

Check out just some of what can be created using Aurasma in this video:

In education, creating an overlay which enriches resources is the most obvious way to use this technology. Imagine being able to embed a book trailer video directly onto the cover of a book, so that students could simply open their phone or other mobile device to the AR app, scan the cover of the book and immediately view the trailer; AR makes this totally possible. Even better if the book trailer is student created – a way to bring student voice directly into the reading experience!

Another option would be to augment a student’s artwork with a video of themselves explaining the work, or a montage of the pieces that inspired their creation – again, not only possible, but easily and quickly done.

A third option is to record a student performance, and then embed this directly onto the criteria sheet, so moderating teachers simply view the sheet through their mobile device to review the student’s singing, dancing, acting etc – what a powerful way to bring assessment to life.

With creativity and imagination, the options are endless. What about using a video to demonstrate the correct pronunciation of foreign language words for a LOTE class, and overlaying these on the flashcards, or researching the plants in the school grounds and overlaying videos with this information onto signs near those trees or plants for others to view. Bring the map of the school’s local area alive with videos of elderly residents sharing their stories of how the area has changed, or link the school choir singing the school song to the logo on your newsletter. Even better, link newsletter photos with video, so parents can experience the moment as it happened.

Younger students could create slideshows of images all beginning with a particular letter or blend and then embed these on alphabet cards, while senior students could list the properties of elements and develop an interactive periodic table..it doesn’t matter what age or stage, AR can allow students to demonstrate their own learning, and then easily share it with others, creating useful resources that other learners can benefit from also.

These are just some examples of how you could use an App such as Aurasma to bring AR into your classroom.  Aurasma is one of the easiest ways to create your own AR overlays. You can do it within the app on your mobile device, or, if you want greater flexibility, download the Aurasma Studio to create on your computer.

Augmented_realityThe steps on this PDF take you through just how you do this (click on the image or click here)

Once you have developed confidence with creating the overlay and combining it with the trigger image to create an AR experience, you can then distribute these either via email to specific users, or more broadly by creating your own ‘channel’ to which users can subscribe. Either choice is easy to set up either within the app itself, or in the online studio environment.

This field is changing all the time, so the best thing to do is just jump in and try it! Now that many students have access to mobile technology (either at home or at school or both), the implementation of AR is likely to become more common (at least more common than it was three years ago when I first wrote about it!).

If you would like to learn more, check out this Pinterest board, which has a growing range of links to different ideas, apps and information about AR – and if you bring AR into your classroom, drop us a line in the comments – we’d love to hear from you!

 

 

Ebooks revisioned with the launch of “The Boat”

The Boat is a book of short stories, authored by Nam Le, which has been extensively used in education to stimulate discussions and elicit challenges about the way Senior students (aged 15 and up) might think about concepts such as war, refugees, resilience, family, intercultural perspectives and more. Extensive teaching guides are available via AustLit & Reading Australia. As a text, it is powerful, and critics admire how Le writes with authenticity across a variety of worldviews and experiences.
To mark the 40th anniversary of the fall of Saigon, SBS has launched an interactive graphic novel, specifically for online audiences, which brings the title story, ‘The Boat’ to a whole new audience, in a whole new way. The work, in Le’s own words,

” is strange and powerful. More importantly, it opens up new ground.”

Using a combination of illustration and movie-making techniques, the online story draws the reader in, as they scroll down at their own pace, immersed in a soundscape that engages the senses and following text that flows across the screen like the ocean the boat is traversing. Experience it here.

As a librarian, this is what I imagine ebooks truly should be. To use Puentedura‘s terms – this is not just a substitution – backlit text on an electronic page – but something that reimagines and redefines storytelling and the experience of story, taking advantage of flexibility in form and function, and drawing together word, image, animation and sound.


flickr photo shared by laura pasquini under a Creative Commons ( BY-NC-SA ) license

While movie sound designer, Sam Petty, reflects on the challenges he experienced while creating in this new media form:

“I’ve had to break up what I do into very specific moments that relate to a particular drawing, extend the mood for as long as someone lingers and provide atmospheres that blend into one another. It’s been fascinating… and quite a technical challenge.”

it is clear to see that this style of publishing requires a whole new literacy to be taught to students. No longer just dealing with alphabetic fonts on a static page, readers must move with the text in a non-linear way – sometimes fading into dreams which feature a collage of line drawing and historical photo, then returning to the main storyline, simultaneously combining their understanding of the interplay of many different forms of expression.

Screengrab from 'The Boat' - click image to access the site.

Screengrab from ‘The Boat’ – click image to access the site.

Will there be more re-imaginings of the ebook, and even more interactive and engaging stories being shared via changing technologies? I hope so. I also hope that educators continue to deepen their definition of literacy, so that students are able to not just consume, but begin to create innovations such as this.

shape-of-text-cover-250-320

 

The shape of texts to come by Jon Callow as well as the work of Anstey and Bull are great places for teachers to begin exploring multiliteracies and the development of visual literacy. Another avenue to explore is that of graphic novels – the format which shapes The Boat – as complex, stand-alone plotlines are developed using text and sequential art. You can read more about the potential of graphic novels in the classroom in this recent ResourceLink blog post, Getting Graphic.

So please, take the time to explore ‘The Boat’ – both interactive and traditional versions. Introduce it to your students (even younger students can access the story as retold on the site); and consider how literacy has changed, is changing, and the impact this has on your practice. Share your thoughts below!

 

 

Learnings from EARCOS 2015 Teachers’ Conference

earcos_programIn March, I was honoured to be invited to present at the EARCOS 2015 Teachers’ Conference, at Sutera Harbour, Kota Kinabalu, Borneo, Malaysia. This conference hosted over 1100 delegates from international schools from the East Asia Region – including China, Malaysia, Phillippines, Myanmar, Singapore, South Korea, Japan, India and more. It was hosted in collaboration with SENIA (Special Educators Network in Asia), and with the theme of “Language for Life”, there were over 100 workshop sessions to choose from, focusing on literacy, language and learning.

The entire conference was an immense learning experience. The decision by the conference to forgo what are (largely) useless conference bags, instead donating this money to Operation Smile, a private not for profit organisation providing reconstructive surgery to children and young adults born in developing countries with facial deformities told me that this would be a conference different to any other I had attended. I was right. I learnt from keynote speakers John Wood and James Stronge, as well as from a range of presenters from the workshops I attended, from the delegates I met and spoke with, and from the experience of presenting to a truly international audience. In this blog post I will try to capture the flavour of the conference, and some of the key learnings I took away from it. I will also include access to the Storify I have compiled, which captures a range of resources from social media (mostly Twitter), which were shared by delegates and presenters throughout the conference.

Learning 1: Want to change the world? Educate children!

rtr_logo_color_mediumThe keynote speaker on the first day was the inspiring John Wood, who founded the Room to Read programme, which focuses on working in collaboration with communities and local governments across Asia and Africa to develop literacy skills and a habit of reading among primary school children, and support girls to complete secondary school with the life skills they’ll need to succeed in school and beyond. So far, Room to Read has constructed 1930 schools, established 17 534 libraries and published 1158 books in local languages, as they work with people to develop a sense of ownership and engagement with education and literacy.

Why is this inspiring? Beyond the obvious, it is inspiring because this project doesn’t focus on giving hand outs – it focuses on working with the people on the ground, so that when the ‘outsiders’ walk away, the project doesn’t just crumble; it continues on, driven by the locals who have been involved from the beginning. It also recognises that investing in children can lead to significant change – educated children become educated adults, who can work to make the changes they want for their communities.

It is ironic that in Australia, and in many other Western, 1st world countries, libraries are increasingly being underfunded and understaffed, when so much of Room to Read’s focus is on building libraries up. Why is this so? Are we satisfied with our levels of literacy, and believe that there is no further need for free and open access to information, literature and inquiry? Ironically, in the age of exploding information and multiple literacies, we are letting go of those people and places who are best placed to support us! A challenge indeed for educators and administrators!

To get an idea of the types of work Room to Read does, check out this video, and then check out the website: http://www.roomtoread.org/donotreadthis/

Learning 2: Literacy comes in many formsrobotics_posters

Programming a computer means nothing more or less than communicating to it in a language that it and the human user can both “understand.” And learning languages is one of the things children do best. Every normal child learns to talk. Why then should a child not learn to “talk” to a computer? – Seymour Papert, Mindstorms (Papert, 1980)

The work that Pana Asavavatana and Maria Peters are doing in Early Childhood at the Taipei American School in Taiwan is amazing. Using a wide variety of resources, these inspiring teachers are incorporating robotics and coding into their early childhood curriculum, in creative and engaging ways. With an emphasis on skill development, Pana and Maria emphasised that kids need to ‘unplug’ to learn computational thinking skills long before they get their hands on any type of technology – and with a range of games and activities, they have done just that. Generously sharing their planning as well as the cutest posters and resource ideas, this session brought home the fact that in today’s world, the literate child can do far more than just read and write alphabetic text.

 

Learning 3: Search is the skill of our era

google_search

Ok, so this one wasn’t really a learning so much as a confirmation of my beliefs from someone whom I have followed online for a long time. Jeff Utecht, of The Thinking Stick blog, has been someone that I have learnt from since my earliest days on the web. His work in international schools and beyond has focused on quality pedagogy enhanced by technology; rather than the other way around, and his session of Search brought home to me just how vital librarians, with enhanced skills in information literacy, are to schools and education. Librarians are some of the best qualified to teach what Jeff states is the most vital skill of our age – that of search – and in Jeff’s session, he revealed a plethora of tools and strategies that support the explicit teaching of these skills to students.

 

Learning 4: “If you can‘t explain it simply, you don‘t understand it well enough.” -Albert Einstein

rrrppp-creative-commonsIn preparing my four 90 minute presentations on Content Curation, Infosavvy Students, Makerspaces and Creative Commons, I realised that the best presentations are the ones that convey ideas simply, and which provide many practical take-aways for the participants. In researching, preparing and creating these workshops, I thought I had learnt almost everything I needed to know on these topics. However, through presenting them, responding to questions, discussing with participants and reflecting on how each session went, I learnt so much more. The experience was rewarding as it was a challenge to prepare workshops for an essentially unknown audience, from a wide range of schools in different countries, with different access to technologies and the internet. I learnt that while international schools face unique challenges to those in my Australian experience, educators the world over are united by a desire to connect, to provide access to the highest quality resources, and to instil in students not just content, but the ability to learn, solve problems and navigate a complex, information saturated world. I also learnt that international schools are at the cutting edge with their approach to contemporary learning; and that the work we do here at BCE and in ResourceLink is equally current and of the highest quality!

Below is a small selection of some of the key takeaways from the conference. For a more detailed summary, please read the Storify I created, a compilation of some of the best sharings from social media throughout the conference.